Home Fitness I Tried 4 Thesis Nootropic Blends (My 2024 Review)
I Tried 4 Thesis Nootropic Blends (My 2024 Review)
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I Tried 4 Thesis Nootropic Blends (My 2024 Review)

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Thesis stands out in the wellness industry with its personalized nootropic supplements, designed to cater to the individual’s specific cognitive needs. It has been pushed by health and wellness celebrities, causing a wave of popularity.

Do Thesis nootropics live up to the hype?

Pros

  • Variety Of Blends: Various nootropic blends based on individual brain chemistry, maximizing effectiveness for each user.
  • Strong Advocacy and Support: Gained endorsements from notable wellness advocates and public figures, like Andrew Huberman, enhancing credibility.

Cons

  • Limited Clinical Research: While the company plans clinical trials, the current scientific backing may be limited.
  • Price: The ongoing cost of customized nootropics may be higher than standard off-the-shelf supplements or medications.
  • Dependence on Self-Reporting: The effectiveness of blends relies partly on user feedback, which may not always be accurate or consistent.
  • Many Underdosed Ingredients: As you’ll read below, many ingredients are dosed below what was used in human clinical trials.
Nooceptin Nootropic

Quick Verdict

What Is Thesis Nootropics?

Thesis Nootropics is a company specializing in customized cognitive performance products. It was founded by Dan Freed in 2017.

Freed’s personal challenges with focusing, which he faced from a young age, led him to discover nootropics.

This personal journey of transformation through nootropics inspired him to create Thesis, aiming to help others find the right combination of nootropic ingredients that work for them.

The company’s unique approach involves allowing customers to experiment with high-quality nootropic ingredients to maximize results systematically.

Thesis has gained popularity primarily through word-of-mouth and a strong focus on personalization.

The company has raised over $13.5 million in funding and is reportedly profitable with a robust growth trajectory.

Thesis has garnered support from health and wellness advocates like Dr. Andrew Huberman, Rich Roll, Kevin Love, and Kate Bock.

Thesis

Thesis Nootropics

Customized Blends For Cognitive Enhancement

Take the quiz and see which blends are right for you.

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Thesis Nootropics

Thesis Nootropic Ingredients

Thesis have six unique blends designed to target various aspects of cognitive function. What’s similar between them is the option to include or exclude caffeine and L-theanine. The caffeine and l-theanine combination is the most potent instant nootropic, making each blend effective.

The caffeine L-theanine stack benefits physical and cognitive function. Some advantages include faster reaction time, faster visual processing speed, better working memory, increased awareness, and less tiredness and mental fatigue [1][2].

The research employs a 2:1 L-theanine to caffeine ratio, which Thesis has followed. Since this stack is available in every blend, I won’t include it in the ingredients breakdown below.

Thesis Clarity Blend

Alpha GPC (Speculative)

Alpha GPC, a choline-containing phospholipid, improves cognitive function in neurological conditions like dementia [3].

Research indicates it enhances memory and attention and may support brain health. Clinical trials show it can improve cognitive performance, especially when combined with other treatments like donepezil [4].

It’s generally well-tolerated and safe. Alpha GPC increases acetylcholine levels in the brain, which is essential for memory and learning [5].

It’s used both as a medicine and a nutritional supplement. Studies suggest Alpha GPC effectively boosts cognitive functions, particularly in adult-onset dementia disorders [6].

Thesis Clarity Blend contains 500 mg, which is more than any other nootropic available.

Lions Mane Mushroom (Speculative)

The Lion’s Mane mushroom (Hericium erinaceus) includes chemicals that stimulate nerve growth factor (NGF) synthesis, which is necessary for nerve cell proliferation and differentiation [7].

According to research, Lion’s Mane improves cognitive abilities, particularly memory and brain cell regeneration [8].

It is renowned for its neuroprotective qualities, which may be effective in treating illnesses such as Alzheimer’s disease and cognitive impairment [9].

Brain functioning, memory, and mood improvements have been linked to regular ingestion [10].

While the mushroom does not directly improve cognitive skills, it does increase NGF, which improves brain health [11]. The dosage varies but is generally well-tolerated and has few negative effects.

Thesis Clarity contains 500 mg of Lions Mane, which may give a long-term nootropic effect.

Mycelium is typically avoided since the active chemicals are found in the primary mushroom. Jeff Chilton, a long-time mushroom researcher, discusses this in the podcast below:

Camellia Sinensis Tea Leaf (Speculative)

Camellia Sinensis, commonly known as tea, exhibits varying neuropharmacological effects based on the part of the plant used.

Seed extracts tend to be more stimulating, enhancing motor functions and showing potential as an antidepressant without causing drowsiness.

Leaf extracts, on the other hand, tend to produce a calming effect on the mind and mood. Both seeds and leaves have shown positive results in various tests assessing motor function and behavior in animal models [12].

The study suggests these parts of the Camellia Sinensis plant have potential as cognitive enhancers, warranting further research, especially on seed extracts for their mode of action and possible new beneficial compounds.

I couldn’t find any human studies for this ingredient, so I can’t give you an efficacious dose range. But Thesis Clarity contains 278 mg of Camellia Sinensis Tea Leaf.

Dihydroxyflavone

Dihydroxyflavone research is all performed in rodents, so extrapolating to humans is rather challenging. 7,8-Dihydroxyflavone (7,8-DHF) is a compound that acts as an agonist for the TrkB receptor, which is associated with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).

BDNF is crucial for neuronal survival and brain plasticity. Studies have shown that 7,8-DHF can improve memory and cognitive functions [13].

It enhanced memory formation in healthy rats, and in Alzheimer’s disease mouse models, it improved spatial memory [14].

Further, 7,8-DHF has been shown to counteract aging-related cognitive impairments in rats, improving spatial memory and synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus [15].

This suggests that 7,8-DHF is a potential therapeutic agent for memory impairment and dementia, at least in rodents.

Thesis Energy Blend Ingredients

Citicoline

Citicoline is commonly mentioned in relation to memory enhancement. According to studies, 500 mg daily may improve episodic memory or the ability to recall personal experiences and specific events [16].

According to other research, taking at least 500 mg of this supplement daily may provide cognitive benefits to healthy persons [17].

The formulation of Thesis Energy Blend contains 300 mg of Citicoline. This dose may not achieve the full potential seen in studies proposing a higher dose.

Mango Leaf

Mango leaf extract, rich in the polyphenolic compound mangiferin, shows promise in neuropharmacology due to its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antidiabetic properties.

Studies indicate its potential in treating central complications associated with metabolic disorders like type 2 diabetes, which are risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia [18].

In animal models, mango leaf extract has demonstrated effects on reducing brain inflammation and spontaneous bleeding and improving cognitive functions [19].

These findings suggest its utility in addressing symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases and cognitive impairments [20].

Thesis Energy contains 300 mg of mango leaf.

Theacrine

Theacrine is a purine alkaloid similar to caffeine, found in the Camellia Kucha plant, and often included in dietary supplements.

Studies show that it can increase energy, focus, and cognitive performance, similar to caffeine, but without habituation [21].

Theacrine’s impact on cognitive performance and physical endurance has been researched in athletes, indicating possible benefits in reaction time and endurance [22].

It may work well alone or in combination with caffeine to enhance cognitive function and physical performance [23].

Theacrine appears to be a promising supplement for improving mental alertness and physical capacity. Bear in mind the manufacturers of Theacrine fund some of these studies.

Thesis Energy contains 100 mg of Theacrine, which tends to be less than the dose used in these studies, suggesting it may have a weaker effect.

N-Acetyl Cysteine

N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) is explored for its potential to improve cognitive functions in psychosis and bipolar disorder due to its antioxidant, neurogenesis, and anti-inflammatory properties.

Studies show N-acetyl cysteine can improve working memory in psychosis [24]. However, results in bipolar disorder didn’t show significant cognitive improvements [25].

Research indicates potential benefits for Alzheimer’s disease by promoting cognitive health and countering oxidative stress [26].

The effectiveness of N-acetyl cysteine in various cognitive disorders still requires more targeted, larger studies to confirm its benefits [27].

N-acetyl cysteine’s role is promising but not yet firmly established in cognitive enhancement.

In human trials, it seems a 600 – 2000 mg dose is needed for cognitive benefits. Thesis Energy contains 500 mg, being potentially underdosed.

Indian Trumpet Tree

Indian Trumpet Tree is known as Oroxylum indicum. In a 12-week study, older adults with memory complaints took 500 mg of Oroxylum indicum extract twice daily [28].

Compared to a placebo, this supplementation led to improvements in episodic memory and numeric working memory. It also accelerated learning in location tasks.

However, there were no significant changes in other cognitive tests or overall cognitive and memory skills.

The study suggests that Oroxylum indicum, while well-tolerated, may primarily enhance specific memory functions.

Its potential effects could be linked to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and interactions with neurotransmitters like dopamine and GABA.

This is the only human study on the Indian Trumpet Tree, so more research is needed to fully understand its impact on cognitive health. Thesis Energy only contains 100 mg of this, making it potentially underdosed.

L-Tyrosine

L-tyrosine, an amino acid, has been shown to increase dopamine levels in the brain. L-tyrosine supplementation has improved cognitive regulation, particularly in mentally demanding settings [29].

It is especially helpful in improving cognitive flexibility, which is impacted by dopamine.

While L-Tyrosine’s promise for treating clinical problems and improving physical activity is limited, it is useful in stressful or cognitively taxing situations.

It has the greatest cognitive benefits when neurotransmitter activity is intact, but dopamine and norepinephrine levels are momentarily decreased [30].

According to research, optimal doses for cognitive improvement begin at a minimum of 2 grams. That is more than six times the dose in Thesis Energy.

Thesis Creativity Blend Ingredients

Alpha GPC

Thesis Creativity contains 150 mg of Alpha GPC, yet their Clarity Blend contains 500 mg. I’m not sure why there is a large discrepancy, especially when 500 mg is likely a more efficacious dose.

Agmatine Sulfate

Currently, agmatine sulfate has only been tested in rodents. It is a central nervous system (CNS) neurotransmitter/neuromodulator that has been studied for its potential effects on stress-related conditions like depression, anxiety, and cognitive performance.

Research suggests that agmatine can have antidepressant and anxiolytic (anxiety-reducing) effects, possibly related to its influence on the nitric oxide pathway [31].

It may reduce oxidative stress and corticosterone levels while increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is beneficial for brain health.

Agmatine sulfate has been shown to be safe and well-tolerated in animal studies, with oral administration effectively increasing its levels in the brain [32].

This indicates potential for therapeutic use in neurological disorders, though more research is needed to fully understand its effects and mechanisms.

Thesis Creativity contains 250 mg. In these studies, patients were administered 15-600 mg per kg, which is a much higher dose.

Panax Ginseng

Panax ginseng is available in two varieties: white ginseng and red ginseng. It has vasorelaxant and moderately hypotensive effects on nitric oxide generation in the body [33].

It increases antioxidant enzyme activity and may prevent oxidative damage associated with aging in rats [34].

Ginseng has shown promise in boosting memory, particularly in age-related cognitive decline, as well as in improving mental and physical resilience, reducing fatigue, and assisting the body in adapting to stress [35].

Daily doses of 200 mg extract or 0.5 to 2 g dry root are recommended. It is not suggested for persons with acute asthma or hypertension because it may cause overstimulation and elevate blood pressure in excessive dosages.

Thesis Creativity has an effective dose of 200 mg, which may provide you with these mental performance benefits.

Ashwagandha Root

Ashwagandha is a traditional herbal remedy used to improve various health conditions. Animal studies have shown that it can increase blood cell counts, which might enhance aerobic capacity [36].

It also demonstrates the potential to reduce oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation, which could be beneficial in treating disorders like tardive dyskinesia [37].

Additionally, Ashwagandha has shown nootropic effects and might be useful in treating Alzheimer’s disease [38]. Recommended dosages range from 6 to 10 grams of ground roots or 100 to 1250 mg of extract daily [39][40].

It’s generally safe but should be used cautiously, especially in cases of hyperthyroidism or pregnancy. High doses can have sedative effects and may cause gastrointestinal issues.

Thesis Creativity contains 300 mg of Ashwagandha, which is within the recommended range for cognitive benefits.

Sceletium Tortuosum

Sceletium tortuosum, also known as Kanna, is traditionally used for its mood-enhancing properties. It’s been studied for its potential in treating cognitive and neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s [41].

Research suggests its constituents could target enzymes and receptors relevant to these diseases, offering neuroprotective benefits like antioxidant activity [42].

Additionally, Sceletium Tortuosum is known for its antidepressant and anxiolytic effects, promoting relaxation and well-being, which could be beneficial in managing stress, anxiety, and depression [43].

The plant’s bioactive alkaloids are also being explored for commercial medicinal use.

The 25 mg dose in Thesis Creativity is the same as used within the human trials.

Thesis Motivation Blend Ingredients

L-Phenylalanine

L-phenylalanine is a vital amino acid and has been explored for its potential benefits in managing conditions like attention deficit disorder and depression.

In studies, doses of up to 1200 mg showed initial improvements in mood and attention in individuals with attention deficit disorder, but tolerance developed over 2-4 months [44].

In another study involving depressed patients, a dosage range of 75–200 mg/day for 20 days led to significant improvements in 12 out of 20 patients [45].

However, the effectiveness and safety of L-phenylalanine can vary, and it is used in the treatment of various conditions, including depression and arthritis, and even as part of addiction recovery [46].

Thesis Motivation has a 500 mg dose, which may provide some of these benefits. Will it improve motivation? I’m not sure.

Methylliberine

Methylliberine is a purine alkaloid explored for its cognitive and mood-enhancing effects. Studies have shown it can improve concentration, motivation, and mood, especially when combined with caffeine.

Methylliberine also appears to positively affect energy levels and well-being without significantly impacting vital signs like heart rate and blood pressure [47].

These findings suggest its potential as a nootropic supplement, particularly for enhancing cognitive function and mood in various contexts, such as gaming or in tactical scenarios [48][49].

However, it’s essential to consider the dosage and combination with other compounds like caffeine for optimal effects.

The 100 mg dose in Thesis Motivation aligns with the current research.

Vitamin B12 (Speculative)

Vitamin B12 is essential for cognitive health and may be linked to neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

Low levels of B12 are associated with cognitive impairment, but supplementation is only shown to be effective in improving cognition in cases of existing B12 deficiency [50].

There is limited evidence that increasing B12 levels benefits people without B12 deficiency [51].

B12’s impact on cognitive health may involve multiple mechanisms, including brain volume and function [52]. However, more extensive research is needed to fully understand its effects and potential as a cognitive enhancer.

Thesis Motivation contains 1000mcg. The research states that it may have no effect if you’re not Vitamin B12 deficient.

Forskolin (Speculative)

Forskolin has only been studied in rodents regarding cognitive function. Forskolin is an herbal extract that shows the potential to improve memory and reduce Alzheimer’s disease symptoms.

In studies, it restored nest-building and social behaviors in mice with Alzheimer-like symptoms, reduced amyloid plaque deposition, and regulated brain inflammation [53].

Forskolin also influences memory and tau protein phosphorylation in the brain, which is relevant in Alzheimer’s [54].

Additionally, forskolin has shown protective effects against Huntington’s disease-like neurodegeneration in rats by improving learning and memory and reducing oxidative stress [55].

These findings indicate forskolin’s potential as a neuroprotective agent for certain neurological conditions, at least in rodents.

I’m skeptical whether 250 mg of Forskolin in Thesis Motivation will help you “feel” more motivated.

Artichoke (Speculative)

Artichoke extract is known for its prebiotic properties and promotes probiotic bacteria growth in the gut, potentially benefiting cognitive functions in mice [56].

In elderly individuals with mild cognitive impairment, combining artichoke extract and aerobic training improved cognitive status and reduced blood glucose and insulin resistance [57].

Artichoke varieties Spinoso Sardo and Romanesco Siciliano demonstrated antioxidant properties and potential protective effects against cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disorders, with Romanesco Siciliano showing higher antioxidant power [58].

The 450 mg dose is well under the dose used in these studies.

Thesis Confidence Blend Ingredients

Saffron (Speculative)

Saffron is traditionally used in herbal medicine and shows promise in improving cognitive function in individuals with Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) [59].

Research indicates that saffron’s effectiveness is comparable to common drugs used for these conditions without increasing side effects. It’s also well-tolerated in cognitively normal individuals [60].

However, most current studies have a high risk of bias. More comprehensive, low-bias clinical trials are needed to confirm saffron’s potential as a treatment for cognitive impairments like AD and MCI.

All of the research used 30 mg of saffron daily. Thesis Confidence has 28 mg, and I’m unsure why they formulated it without the extra 2 mg.

Magnesium Bisglycinate

Magnesium is essential for brain functions and has been researched for its potential cognitive benefits. Magnesium is particularly effective in increasing brain magnesium levels and has shown promise in improving memory and cognition in healthy adults [61].

However, its role in anxiety and mood disorders is less clear [62].

Studies indicate magnesium may help reduce symptoms of depression, but results are not consistent across all mental health conditions [63].

Further research is needed to conclusively establish magnesium’s effectiveness and appropriate use as a therapeutic supplement in various psychiatric and cognitive disorders [64].

500 mg of magnesium may help if you’re deficient, but there’s no clear benefit to making you more confident.

Sage (Speculative)

Sage is known as Salvia and has been traditionally known to enhance memory. A recent study supports this, showing that acute ingestion of sage oil can significantly improve immediate word recall in healthy young adults [65].

This suggests that sage may positively influence cognitive functions like memory, potentially due to its acetylcholinesterase inhibition activity in the brain.

However, this has not been replicated.

While historically used for various mental disorders, such as depression and age-related memory loss, contemporary research is needed to fully understand its benefits and potential as a cognitive enhancer.

Regardless of the 333 mg dose, this is one of the more speculative ingredients in all Thesis blends.

Sceletium Tortuosum (Speculative)

As mentioned in the Creativity Blend, Sceletium Tortuosum is known for its mood-enhancing properties. It is the same dose of 25 mg, which is used in human trials.

Magnolia Bark (Speculative)

Magnolia officinalis is commonly used in traditional medicine for mental disorders like anxiety and depression and shows potential as a nootropic supplement.

Studies have demonstrated that its ethanol extract can improve cognitive function and memory in stress-induced situations. It also exhibits anxiolytic properties, reducing anxiety-related behaviors in rats [66].

The extract’s effectiveness is also evident in lowering stress-induced increases in corticosterone and tyrosine hydroxylase levels.

Moreover, Magnolia officinalis, especially its component honokiol, has neuroprotective effects and can regulate mood disorders by modulating GABA and CB1 receptors in rats [67].

These are rodent studies, so it’s impossible to extrapolate to humans. Regardless, it’s included based on the mechanistic data with the theory of doing the same thing in humans with the 10 mg dose.

Ashwagandha Leaf & Root

The 120 mg of root and leaf ashwagandha may be enough to have a nootropic effect as the extract dose is between 100-1200 mg, as stated in the Creativity Blend section. However, this is root and leaf, and the main benefits are derived from the root.

Thesis Logic Blend Ingredients

Ginko Biloba

Ginkgo biloba is extracted from the leaves and fruit to improve cognitive function. Its compounds include antioxidants, enhance blood flow, and have anti-inflammatory properties.

Ginkgo biloba extract has been shown in animal studies to help with chronic brain difficulties by modifying inflammatory mediators and the cholinergic system [68].

It has been shown in clinical trials to improve working memory and processing speed [69]. However, its usefulness in healthy people under the age of 60 is debatable [70].

Typical daily doses vary from 120 to 300 mg. Although side effects are uncommon, they can include stomach irritation and headaches, which may cause blood to thin, affecting people on certain drugs.

Thesis Logic contains 160 mg of Ginkgo Biloba, which is within the recommended dosage range.

Theobromine

Theobromine is a compound found in chocolate and has been studied for its potential cognitive effects.

Research indicates that theobromine might have a lesser immediate nootropic effect compared to caffeine but could have neuroprotective benefits with long-term consumption, possibly reducing Alzheimer’s disease-related pathology [71].

Further studies are needed to fully understand its impact on cognition.

Additionally, theobromine’s effects on mood and vigilance appear to be different from caffeine, with some studies suggesting it might not significantly influence these aspects in nutritionally relevant doses [72].

However, combining theobromine with caffeine could modify its effects, potentially offering cognitive and mood benefits without significant blood pressure increases [73].

More research is required to confirm theobromine’s cognitive and mood-related effects.

Thesis Logic contains 100 mg of theobromine, but it seems doses greater than 400 mg are needed to enhance cognition.

Phosphatidylserine

Phosphatidylserine is essential for proper brain function. Phosphatidylserine has been proven to be critical for maintaining nerve cell membranes and myelin, which is required for successful neurotransmission [74].

Phosphatidylserine can help reverse cognitive loss as the brain ages by boosting cognitive activities such as memory formation, learning, concentration, and problem-solving [75].

It is well absorbed in humans and crosses the blood-brain barrier.

Supplements containing phosphatidylserine have been shown to increase cognitive functions and are generally well-tolerated, with dosages ranging from 100 to 800 mg per day advised for cognitive support [76][77].

Thesis Logic contains 400 mg of phosphatidylserine, which may provide you with these cognitive-enhancing effects.

High DHA Algae

DHA is a vital component of neuronal membranes and plays an important role in brain health and cognitive function.

Adult cognitive abilities are improved by DHA consumption, especially when paired with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) [78].

This impact is most noticeable in older people who have mild memory problems. Higher DHA and EPA doses (above 1 g per day) have been associated with better episodic memory.

Observational studies also show a link between DHA/EPA intake and memory performance in the elderly. DHA, both alone and in combination with EPA, improves memory in the elderly.

Thesis Logic contains 200 mg of DHA, suggesting insufficient DHA to provide a benefit.

Triacetyluridine (Speculative)

Triacetyluridine is being explored as a potential treatment for bipolar depression. In a study involving eleven patients with bipolar depression, high doses of triacetyluridine (up to 18 g per day) were administered over 6 weeks [79].

The study measured the effects on depression symptoms using the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and evaluated cellular bioenergetics using phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (P-MRSI).

Results indicated significant early improvement in depression symptoms.

Additionally, triacetyluridine responders showed notable differences in pH changes from baseline, suggesting triacetyluridine may improve mitochondrial function and reduce symptoms of depression.

Thesis Logic has 30 mg of triacetyluridine, which is well below the dose used in this study.

Bacopa Monnieri

Bacopa monnieri is a traditional plant that has been shown to improve cognitive performance, particularly memory.

Bacopa extract, namely bacosides A and B, has been demonstrated in studies to increase memory formation, recall, and cognitive function [80].

It has neuroprotective properties and is used to treat cognitive dysfunctions such as Alzheimer’s disease.

Adults should take between 200 and 400 mg each day. Bacopa is generally well accepted, with only rare reports of mild drowsiness or stomach difficulties.

Clinical trials show that older people have better memory, attention, mood, and overall cognitive ability [81][82][83]. More research is needed, however, to thoroughly grasp its usefulness across many cognitive domains.

Thesis Logic contains 320 mg of Bacopa, giving you the efficacious dose to feel these benefits.

Thesis Nootropics Price

Thesis Nootropic Review

Thesis has two options: one time purchase or a subscription. Here’s how the prices break down:

  • Subscription = $79
  • One Time Purchase = $119

This is regardless of whether you purchase a personalized starter kit or build your own box.

You can’t buy them individually either. You must purchase 4 boxes. When building your own, you can choose if you want 4 of the same blend or mix and match.

They want you to try each blend for a week as part of the starter kit (there’s only a week’s worth of each blend in each container) to see which you like best.

Thesis has positioned itself as the most expensive nootropic available by adding the personalized element.

Is Thesis Nootropics Really Personalized?

I went through the initial quiz to see how they “personalize” their nootropic stack.

Thesis Baseline

Here is what they recommended me:

Thesis Picks

Look, I get the marketing angle. In no way is this a truly personalized nootropic product. It’d be nearly impossible to create custom formulations for every unique individual.

However, the fact they have multiple blends means people can experiment to find which works best for them.

I will say, though, if you choose the caffeine options, every blend will work. Many of the ingredients used in these blends are speculative and only based on animal research, with many being underdosed.

Benefits Of Thesis Nootropics

Multiple Blends For Different Purposes

To be honest, this benefit is more of a marketing tactic. However, some people may find certain blends jive well with them over others, giving you options within the same brand.

Further, Thesis claims the ingredients in each formulation work synergistically. There’s no research to back that claim, but at least know there are no negative side effects from their interaction.

Options For Stimulants Or Not

You can choose whether or not you want stimulants within your Thesis Blends. Every blend will provide similar benefits if you add the caffeine and L-theanine nootropic stack, which is the most potent synergistic brain booster.

However, if you’re already a coffee addict or plan to take Thesis in the evening, having no stimulants is the better option.

My Experience With Thesis

Based on my quiz, I was recommended Thesis Clarity, Logic, Motivation, and Confidence Blends. I tried each for a week to see if one stood out. I took them without caffeine as they all work if you have the caffeine L-theanine stack.

I have to say the Confidence and Motivation Blends did absolutely nothing for me. I didn’t “feel” any brain-boosting effects or feel more confident or motivated.

I felt the Logic and Clarity Blends had small positive effects when concentrating on mentally demanding tasks like writing, coaching, or podcasting.

If I were to continue taking Thesis, I’d opt for either of these two blends.

Who Is Thesis For?

Busy Working Professionals

Thesis Nootropics are ideal for busy professionals facing demanding schedules and high-stress environments. These blends can help enhance focus, improve decision-making, and increase productivity.

They are designed to support sustained mental energy throughout the day, enabling professionals to manage their workload more effectively without the usual mental fatigue.

Creative Artists

For creative artists, Thesis offers blends that stimulate creativity and enhance divergent thinking. These nootropics can aid in breaking through creative blocks, fostering innovative thinking, and maintaining a heightened state of inspiration.

They are particularly beneficial for artists seeking longer periods of creative flow and those seeking fresh perspectives.

Students

Students can significantly benefit from Thesis Nootropics, especially during intense studying or when facing challenging academic projects.

The blends are formulated to enhance memory retention, improve concentration, and boost learning capabilities. This makes them a valuable tool for students who need to absorb and retain large amounts of information and perform well in academic assessments.

Gamers

Gamers find Thesis Nootropics beneficial for improving their gaming performance. The blends can enhance reaction times, increase focus, and improve strategic thinking skills.

They are particularly useful during long gaming sessions, helping gamers stay alert and responsive, which is crucial in competitive gaming scenarios.

Coffee Haters

Thesis Nootropics provides an excellent alternative for those who dislike coffee or want to avoid caffeine jitters.

These blends offer a way to boost mental energy and alertness without relying on caffeine. This makes them ideal for individuals sensitive to caffeine or those seeking to reduce caffeine intake while maintaining high cognitive function.

User Testimonials And Reviews

You can’t access the review database on the Thesis website, so I did some digging to find user reviews. Here’s a couple of positive reviews:

“I must admit that during the weeks that I consistently take them, I perform better & I generally feel better just knowing I’ve ingested something intended to positively alter my natural brain state. Minor tasks/chores no longer seem as daunting and I get this underlying kick to complete my work well.” – ParsnipExtreme2502 (Reddit)

“I didn’t find Weeks 1 and 4 to do anything for me, but Weeks 2 and 3 really helped avoid the post-lunch, post-work slumps I tend to get now that I’ve been working from home; Energy is especially useful for days when I haven’t gotten enough sleep the night before.” – leftylucy88 (Reddit)

I can’t find many negative reviews other than potential side effects like migraines, which can be caused by many different factors.

Thesis Side Effects

Side effects are rare from the ingredients in these blends. I personally didn’t have any adverse reactions to the four blends I tried. However, like any supplement, they may have potential side effects.

Consult with a healthcare provider before starting any nootropic regimen, especially if they have pre-existing health conditions, are pregnant or breastfeeding, or are taking other medications.

Thesis Alternatives

If Thesis Nootropics isn’t quite the right match for you or you’re just curious about other products, here are some alternatives I’ve tried and can provide an insider’s look into.

Nooceptin

Nooceptin Nootropic

SAP Nutra nootropic Nooceptin improves memory, concentration, and cognitive performance without stimulants. It offers gradual brain health gains.

It improves memory and focus and provides a prolonged boost without a caffeine crash. Students, gamers, professionals, and seniors should use Nooceptin to boost cognition.

This brain supplement contains Lion’s Mane Extract, Citicoline, Rhodiola Rosea Extract, L-Theanine, Bacopa Monnieri, Ginkgo Biloba, and Panax Ginseng.

Some of these compounds have been shown to be useful, but others are experimental. Nooceptin, a non-stimulant method for long-term cognitive enhancement, usually works after 7-14 days.

Despite the risk of underdosed components and increased cost, Nooceptin may provide a stimulant-free cognitive boost.

Read more in our Nooceptin review.

Mind Lab Pro

Mind Lab Pro

Mind Lab Pro is a popular nootropic that has gained appeal as a result of its alleged cognitive benefits.

Pure substances are used in its formulation, which is intended to improve mental clarity and attention. It is stimulant-free, making it an excellent choice for anyone seeking a well-rounded routine.

Its unique combination of 11 research-backed components distinguishes it from competitors in the brain health supplement sector.

These compounds were carefully chosen to help cognitive processes like memory, focus, mental clarity, mood, and cognitive processing speed.

Despite some criticism about the quantity of specific substances and the need for more scientific data, Mind Lab Pro has earned worldwide recognition for its ability to improve cognitive performance in professionals, students, the elderly, and athletes.

Our Mind Lab Pro review goes into great detail.

Braini

Braini

Braini distinguishes itself by being stimulant-free, providing long-term results, and having a short ingredient list focusing on long-term cognitive gains. It does not, however, deliver the immediate euphoric boost that some users may expect from a brain supplement.

Peptylin, a silk protein peptide with neuroprotective effects and potential benefits for executive function; NeurXcel, which is rich in omega fatty acids; and Wild Canadian Blueberry extract, which is known for its antioxidant characteristics and cognitive support, are all key ingredients in Braini.

Braini is backed by clinical trials, a 60-day money-back guarantee, and a 30-day challenge to scientifically quantify changes in brain function.

Our Braini review contains an in-depth breakdown.

Vyvamind

Vyvamind

Vyvamind is a nootropic supplement containing caffeine and L-theanine to help focus and improve cognitive performance. Users claim increased focus, vitality, and cognitive abilities without big crashes.

Vyvamind’s formulation, which contains less L-tyrosine and citicoline than some studies suggest, is intended to supplement the major nootropic duo of caffeine and L-theanine.

This combination is well-known for boosting concentration and cognitive function. The supplement is touted as a non-stimulant alternative, appealing to clients seeking a more natural and less intensive approach to cognitive growth.

Vyvamind is suitable for coffee-averse people, busy professionals who require a focus boost, and students during study sessions.

Our Vyvamind review goes into great detail.

NooCube

NooCube

Because of its purported fast cognitive effects, NooCube is a popular brain-boosting product. NooCube contains ingredients such as Bacopa Monnieri, L-Tyrosine, and L-Theanine.

These are well-known for their mental health advantages. Several compounds, such as Huperzine-A and Alpha GPC, remain speculative without additional investigation.

NooCube is intended to improve cognition and alertness without using stimulants, and the amounts of each ingredient are clearly labeled.

Because it gives different cognitive benefits without the jittery side effects associated with caffeine, NooCube is especially good for working professionals, students, elders, gamers, and combat athletes.

Our detailed analysis can be found in our NooCube review.

Frequently Asked Questions

What Is Thesis Nootropic And What Does It Do?

Thesis Nootropic is a personalized supplement formulated to enhance cognitive functions. Users can expect improvements in focus, reduction in procrastination, stress management, and memory recall, depending on which blend you choose.

Does Thesis Work Like Adderall?

Thesis Nootropics and Adderall are used to enhance cognitive functions, but they are fundamentally different. Adderall is primarily prescribed for treating Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy.

Adderall is an amphetamine, classified as a controlled substance due to its strong stimulating effects and potential for abuse and dependency.

Thesis Nootropics are dietary supplements designed to enhance healthy individuals’ cognitive functions, such as memory, focus, and mental clarity. They are not intended to treat medical conditions like ADHD.

How Long Does It Take Thesis Nootropics To Work?

If you have the caffeine version, within 30 minutes. You may feel the non-stimulant blends kicking in just as quickly, but they won’t be as pronounced. Sometimes, they can take multiple weeks to feel them working.

Conclusion

I’ve taken a deep dive into the world of nootropics and shared my firsthand experience with Thesis Nootropic’s various blends. While the personalization is nothing more than a marketing tactic, the different blends are a nice touch for those who want to experiment with different ingredients.

Thesis

Thesis Nootropics

Customized Blends For Cognitive Enhancement

Take the quiz and see which blends are right for you.

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Thesis Nootropics

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James de Lacey James is a professional strength & conditioning coach that works with professional and international level teams and athletes. He owns Sweet Science of Fighting, is a published scientific researcher and has completed his Masters in Sport & Exercise Science. He's combined my knowledge of research and experience to bring you the most practical bites to be applied to your combat training.